PARK(ing) Day

One day a year, in cities throughout the country, parking spots take on a whole new meaning. Simply by paying the parking meter and rolling out some grass, residents claim these spaces as public parks—and have their say about how small but precious pieces of urban real estate are used.

Source: http://www.yesmagazine.org/

Signs changed for PARK(ing) Day 2008 in New York City. Photo by Linus Gelber.

Signs changed for PARK(ing) Day 2008 in New York City. Photo by Linus Gelber.

A PARK(ing) space in San Francisco's financial district during the first event in 2005.

A PARK(ing) space in San Francisco's financial district during the first event in 2005.

Gregory Kellet unfurls sod for a park.

Gregory Kellet unfurls sod for a park.

A park in front of Ritual Coffee Roasters in San Francisco. Photo by Scott Beale / laughingsquid.com

A park in front of Ritual Coffee Roasters in San Francisco. Photo by Scott Beale / laughingsquid.com

Temporary park spot in Flint, Michigan. Photo by Shaun Smakal.

Temporary park spot in Flint, Michigan. Photo by Shaun Smakal.

Rebar's PARKcycle—a human-powered, moving park—was built for the 2007 event in collaboration with sculptor Reuben Margolin.

Rebar's PARKcycle—a human-powered, moving park—was built for the 2007 event in collaboration with sculptor Reuben Margolin.

A San Francisco parking spot was transformed into a grassy park during the 2006 event.

A San Francisco parking spot was transformed into a grassy park during the 2006 event.

A Scrabble game played at one PARK(ing) Day spot in New York City in 2008. The temporary Staycation Park, at the corner of Court Street and Atlantic Avenue was one of 50 spots in the city. Photo by Linus Gelber.

A Scrabble game played at one PARK(ing) Day spot in New York City in 2008. The temporary Staycation Park, at the corner of Court Street and Atlantic Avenue was one of 50 spots in the city. Photo by Linus Gelber.

PARK(ing) Day in San Francisco. Photo by Andrea Scher / Rebar.

PARK(ing) Day in San Francisco. Photo by Andrea Scher / Rebar.

A lending library park created at Market and Duboce in San Francisco in 2007. Photo by Lawrence Cuevas.

A lending library park created at Market and Duboce in San Francisco in 2007. Photo by Lawrence Cuevas.

YES! Magazine. Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported.

YES! Magazine. Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported.

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